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  1. Shaving 3 grams off the daily salt intake of Americans could prevent up to 66,000 strokes, 99,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths in the United States, while saving $24 billion in health costs per year, researchers reported (Reuters Life, Jan 2010).

    Less salt means lower blood pressure and less disease. According to experts' report from the Institute of Medicine, in 2005, high blood pressure (hypertension) was responsible for one-in-six deaths in the United States. Hypertension harms the heart, brain, and kidneys.

  2. Cancer Linked to Other Chronic Illnesses.
    People With High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Heart Attack More Likely to Have Cancer.

    April 2, 2010 -- Having a heart attack or chronic illness may raise the risk of being diagnosed with cancer, according to a new survey.

  3. Should Healthy People Take Statins?.

    April 2, 2010 – Should healthy people take a cholesterol-lowering drug to prevent heart disease even if they don't have high cholesterol? The answer, for some people, is yes. It's a controversial answer that raises a lot of questions. Here are WebMD's answers to those questions. Read more @ WebMD.

  4. As reported in the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Weekly Newsletter of 2/17/2010, USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-funded scientists have reported new reasons for choosing “heart-healthy” oats at the grocery store. Nutritionist Mohsen Meydani, Director of the Vascular Biology Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, Mass., led the research on the oat compounds, called avenanthramides. Meydani has previously shown that phenolic antioxidants in oats obstruct the ability of blood cells to stick to artery walls.

  5. You have likely been warned about type-2 diabetes, high cholesterol and heart disease as some of the conditions caused by obesity. Include a fatty liver!

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common severe liver disease from which Americans suffer, and is the most prevalent liver disease among children. An estimated 1.6 million children are affected, according to Children's Memorial Hospital's Web site. But, most of them probably don't realize they are ill.

    Fatty liver is "typically associated with abnormal depositing of fat in liver cells," said Dr.

  6. The United States spent about $2.2 trillion on healthcare in 2007. This accounts for 16 percent of our gross domestic product, and that's projected to rise to 20 percent by 2017. Much of this healthcare spending can be tied to preventable health problems. Here are some examples of preventable health problems: The largest numbers of deaths in the United States are caused by two preventable causes - tobacco smoking and high blood pressure - killing an estimated 467,000 and 395,000 people respectively in 2005.

  7. In the United States, only about 4% of total annual health expenditure is directed at preventing chronic diseases. As the national conversation about healthcare reform continues, there should be a paradigm shift in healthcare practice - working to improve health through prevention rather than mainly managing symptoms. The United States spent about $2.2 trillion on healthcare in 2007. This accounts for 16 percent of our gross domestic product, and that's projected to rise to 20 percent by 2017.

  8. Recent research findings from Wales indicate that increased intake of milk and other dairy products may reduce metabolic syndrome and should be recommended as part of a healthy eating pattern.  Peter Elwood and colleagues from Cardiff University studied the diet and incidence of metabolic syndrome among 2375 men, and found that men who drank milk and ate dairy products regularly were 62 per cent less likely to have the syndrome.

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a condition characterized by central obesity, hypertension, and disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism.

  9. Cholesterol makes vital contributions to health, a major component of all human cell membranes and a building block of steroid hormones, including cortisol, estrogen, and testosterone.  However, high levels of cholesterol, particularly LDL cholesterol ("bad cholesterol"), have a long association with many diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the leading cause of death in the world. CVD are diseases of the heart and blood vessels that can cause heart attacks and stroke.  More than 100 million adults in the United States have high cholesterol.

  10. People who consume more fruit and fiber are more likely to have healthier body weights, according to researchers at the University of Texas at Austin. Two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese. Carrying around extra body fat increases the risk for a host of diseases, and cardiovascular disease is at the very top, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While obesity is a very complex problem and researchers and health professionals continue to seek answers for safe and effective weight-loss options, one simple solution for achieving a healthier body weight is to eat more fruits and fiber.

  11. Lifelong SupplementsTM health news! In the US, there are over 20 million people with diabetes, equal to seven per cent of the population. The total costs are thought to be as much as $132 billion, with $92 billion being direct costs from medication, according to 2002 American Diabetes Association figures.  In Europe, an estimated 19 million people are affected by diabetes in the EU 25, equal to four per cent of the total population.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, and high blood cholesterol, and linked by the underlying resistance to insulin.  Some experts refer to it as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors disease associated with insulin resistance.  It is estimated that metabolic syndrome affects about 50 million Americans.  Possible outcomes of metabolic syndrome include the development of type-2 diabetes and increased risk of stroke and other heart diseases.

  13. Number of people with diabetes in United States increased to 24 million according to 2007 data by U.S. Center of Disease Control and Prevention.  About 57 million people have pre-diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production (i.e., "insulin resistance" syndrome) that causes sugar to build up in the body.  "Insulin resistance" leaves excess sugar in the bloodstream, which damages small blood vessels in the eyes, kidneys, and other organs.

  14. Physicians long have known the importance of this vitamin in building strong bones. However, research is emerging that suggests vitamin D plays a much broader role in maintaining optimal health. Vitamin D may help in preventing and treating a growing number of health problems -- including diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, depression, chronic pain, migraines, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and certain types of cancers.
    At the same time, more people are at risk of being deficient in this essential nutrient than had previously been thought.

  15. Boosting levels of potassium in the diet may lower a person's risk of developing high blood pressure and may decrease blood pressure in people who already have "hypertension." The typical American diet contains about double the sodium and half the potassium that is currently recommended in dietary guidelines. Low potassium intake is thought to contribute to the prevalence of high blood pressure in Americans.

  16. "The most pressing issue for the 21st Century is nutrition, with obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders all linked to diet, and omega-3 will play a major role" (Dr. Dyerberg, Omega-3 pioneer).  According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), "in the last few years, experts have looked at omega-3s and asthma, cancer, the aging brain, dementia, neurological diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, lupus, osteoporosis, eye health, mental health, and more".

  17. High triglyceride level is a threat to heart disease and diabetes.  Having triglycerides over 150 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol under 40 mg/dl, have a higher risk for heart disease.  High triglycerides are especially associated with insulin resistance -- a pre-diabetic state -- and diabetes.  Lifestyle changes such as normalizing your weight, dietary modifications, and exercise can lower triglyceride levels sufficiently.

  18. The intestinal bifidobacteria (naturally occurring gut benefical bacteria) decreases in old age.  The decrease is often considered as one of the causes of aging, immunity decreases, and adult diseases such as cancer and arthritis.  About 70% of our immune system is said to be in our digestive tract.  Probiotics (beneficial bacteria) and/or lifelong prebiotic supplements help reinforce the natural gut flora thus boosting gut health and immunity.

  19. Nutrition is coming to the fore as a major modifiable determinant of chronic disease, with scientific evidence increasingly supporting the view that alterations in diet have strong effects, both positive and negative, on health throughout life (World Health Org 2003).  Dietary adjustments may not only influence present health, but may determine whether or not an individual will develop such diseases as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes much later in life.

  20. A century or so ago, the biggest health threats for Americans were infection, malnutrition, and poor sanitation. But today, more lives are in jeopardy from chronic conditions largely attributable to diet-chief among them, heart disease. In fact, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.  Research shows that more than 80% of heart disease can be prevented by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising daily, not smoking, drinking alcohol in moderation, and eating a healthy diet.                  1-269-978-0955
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