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Blog.lifelongsupplements
Listing all posts with label heart disease. Show all posts.
  1. Shaving 3 grams off the daily salt intake of Americans could prevent up to 66,000 strokes, 99,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths in the United States, while saving $24 billion in health costs per year, researchers reported (Reuters Life, Jan 2010).

    Less salt means lower blood pressure and less disease. According to experts' report from the Institute of Medicine, in 2005, high blood pressure (hypertension) was responsible for one-in-six deaths in the United States. Hypertension harms the heart, brain, and kidneys.

  2. Cancer Linked to Other Chronic Illnesses.
    People With High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Heart Attack More Likely to Have Cancer.

    April 2, 2010 -- Having a heart attack or chronic illness may raise the risk of being diagnosed with cancer, according to a new survey.

  3. The United States spent about $2.2 trillion on healthcare in 2007. This accounts for 16 percent of our gross domestic product, and that's projected to rise to 20 percent by 2017. Much of this healthcare spending can be tied to preventable health problems. Here are some examples of preventable health problems: The largest numbers of deaths in the United States are caused by two preventable causes - tobacco smoking and high blood pressure - killing an estimated 467,000 and 395,000 people respectively in 2005.

  4. In the United States, only about 4% of total annual health expenditure is directed at preventing chronic diseases. As the national conversation about healthcare reform continues, there should be a paradigm shift in healthcare practice - working to improve health through prevention rather than mainly managing symptoms. The United States spent about $2.2 trillion on healthcare in 2007. This accounts for 16 percent of our gross domestic product, and that's projected to rise to 20 percent by 2017.

  5. Cholesterol makes vital contributions to health, a major component of all human cell membranes and a building block of steroid hormones, including cortisol, estrogen, and testosterone.  However, high levels of cholesterol, particularly LDL cholesterol ("bad cholesterol"), have a long association with many diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the leading cause of death in the world. CVD are diseases of the heart and blood vessels that can cause heart attacks and stroke.  More than 100 million adults in the United States have high cholesterol.

  6. Number of people with diabetes in United States increased to 24 million according to 2007 data by U.S. Center of Disease Control and Prevention.  About 57 million people have pre-diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production (i.e., "insulin resistance" syndrome) that causes sugar to build up in the body.  "Insulin resistance" leaves excess sugar in the bloodstream, which damages small blood vessels in the eyes, kidneys, and other organs.

  7. Physicians long have known the importance of this vitamin in building strong bones. However, research is emerging that suggests vitamin D plays a much broader role in maintaining optimal health. Vitamin D may help in preventing and treating a growing number of health problems -- including diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, depression, chronic pain, migraines, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and certain types of cancers.
    At the same time, more people are at risk of being deficient in this essential nutrient than had previously been thought.

  8. High triglyceride level is a threat to heart disease and diabetes.  Having triglycerides over 150 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol under 40 mg/dl, have a higher risk for heart disease.  High triglycerides are especially associated with insulin resistance -- a pre-diabetic state -- and diabetes.  Lifestyle changes such as normalizing your weight, dietary modifications, and exercise can lower triglyceride levels sufficiently.

  9. Nutrition is coming to the fore as a major modifiable determinant of chronic disease, with scientific evidence increasingly supporting the view that alterations in diet have strong effects, both positive and negative, on health throughout life (World Health Org 2003).  Dietary adjustments may not only influence present health, but may determine whether or not an individual will develop such diseases as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes much later in life.

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